Scottish Terrier
fine art painting
fine art painting
fine art painting
fine art painting
fine art painting
fine art painting
fine art painting

Lilian Cheviot

British, (1876-1936)
Scottish Terrier
Oil on canvas, signed

Lilian Cheviot was born Lilian Brown in Hull, Yorkshire in 1876. By the mid 1890’s she had moved to London to study at Frank Calderon's School of Animal Painting and later at Walter Donne's Life School. Around the same time she changed her name from Brown to Cheviot, which may have been to make herself more distinctive. She was the same age as the animal painter Florence Mabel Hollams who also attended Frank Calderon’s School and they may well have known each other.

She lived at Thorpe in East Molesey, Surrey from where she made her debut at the Royal Academy and the Royal Society of British Artists in 1895. She also exhibited at the Society of Lady Artists’ Exhibition, Birmingham Royal Society of Artists, South Wales Art Society, Cardiff, Bradford Art Gallery, Cathedral Art Gallery, Manchester and the Mendoza Gallery. The Graves Gallery later held solo exhibitions of her work in 1904, 1906 and 1909.

In 1897, she officially changed her name by deed poll from Lilian Brown to Lilian Cheviot. She began earning a reputation and praise from art critics for being a skilled animal artist, with all of her work painted from life. She specialised in portraits of dogs, cats and horses and became fairly successful, earning many commissions. Her patrons included Princess Alice of Albany, Lord Arthur Cecil, Lady Crawford, the Earl of Lonsdale and Mr Parker of Burfield Hall, one of the founders of the Ladies Kennel Association.

She spent time at a zoo and produced several studies of lions, tigers and wolves which were exhibited at the Mendoza Gallery in 1911. One of her paintings ‘On the way to the Horse Fair’ was included in ‘Women Painters of the World’ by Walter Shaw Sparrow, published in 1905. As well as paintings, she also provided illustrations for The Graphic and other magazines. A number of her dog paintings were reproduced as prints popular greetings cards by a German company.

By 1919 she had moved to Russell Street in Kensington where she lived until the 1930’s. She remained single all he life and continued to paint and exhibit until a few years before her death. She spent her remaining years living at 267 Kings Road, Kingston-upon-Thames. She died in Thames Ditton, Surrey on 14 June 1936.

Examples of her work are held by the National Trust and the Zoological Society of London.

Presentation The painting is housed in its original gilt frame which is in excellent condition.
Condition As with all of our original antique oil paintings, this work is offered in ready to hang gallery condition, having been professionally cleaned, restored and revarnished.

Dimensions

Image Size 21.75 inches x 17.75 inches (55cm x 45cm)
Framed Size 30.5 inches x 26.5 inches (77.5cm x 67.5cm)
£5,600.00