Portrait of Lady Hyndford in a White Satin Dress
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fine art painting
fine art painting
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fine art painting
fine art painting
fine art painting
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fine art painting

Circle of Allan Ramsay

Scottish, (1713-1784)
Portrait of Lady Hyndford in a White Satin Dress
Oil on canvas
Provenance: Plaish Hall, Church Stretton, Shropshire. A label on the reverse indicates it was also in the collection of the Rev’d John Walcot (1766-1834) of Bitterly Court, Shropshire

A fine three quarter length portrait of a lady in a white dress, circle of Allan Ramsay. The sitter is believed to be Janet Grant who later became Lady Hyndford. Janet was the eldest daughter of William Grant, Lord Prestongrange and Lord Advocate of Scotland from 1746 to 1754. She married John Carmichael (1710-87) of Castle Craig. Her husband succeeded his cousin the 3rd Earl as 4th Earl of Hyndford in 1767.She wears a fashionable white satin dress criss-crossed at the front with a blue satin ribbon. At her bosom are yellow and orange flowers, possibly Narcissi, which symbolise youth and fertility and are also an emblem of future prosperity. She holds a book in her hand and another rests under her elbow, signifying learning and presenting her as an accomplished young woman. It is therefore highly likely that this was a betrothal portrait. The painting has clearly been executed by an artist of great ability who has been influenced by Allan Ramsay.

Allan Ramsay was born in 1713 the eldest son of the poet and author Allan Ramsay. He attended the new Academy of St Luke, Edinburgh before moving to London around 1723 to study at the St. Martin's Lane Academy under the Swedish painter Hans Hysing. In 1736 he travelled to Rome and Naples to continue his art education.

He returned to Edinburgh in 1738 and began receiving commissions to paint portraits from important patrons such as the Duke of Argyll. He later moved to London where he set up a studio and his artistic skill and charming personality helped him become highly successful. In 1752 after the death of his first wife, he married one of his drawing pupils Margaret Lindsay, the eldest daughter of Sir Alexander Lindsay of Evelick. Together they spent time in Italy where Ramsay continued to paint and draw old masters, antiquities and archaeological sites. After returning to England in 1761, Ramsay was appointed Principal Painter in Ordinary to George III. He died in Dover in 1784.


Many of his paintings are held by public collections including the Ashmolean Museum, Dundee Art Gallery, Glasgow Museum, National Gallery, Scottish National Gallery, Warwickshire Museum and the National Trust.

The painting is housed in its original period gilt frame, which is in excellent condition.

£11,500.00
Image Size 49.5 inches x 39.5 inches (126cm x 100.5cm)
Framed Size 57 inches x 47 inches (145cm x 119.5cm)