Gentlemen of the Common
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fine art painting
fine art painting
fine art painting
fine art painting
fine art painting
fine art painting
fine art painting
fine art painting

Herbert ‘William’ Weekes

British, (1841-1914)
Gentlemen of the Common
Oil on panel, signed
Provenance: Eugene Haigh, 13 Great Turnstile, Holborn

A humorous painting of a donkey and pigs by Herbert ‘William’ Weekes on a common. The animals appear to be engaging in a friendly conversation whilst out for a walk in the countryside. Weekes was adept at portraying animals in human like situations; a skill which he became well known for.

Herbert William Weekes was born in Pimlico, London on 8 May, 1841 to the sculptor Henry Weekes (1807-1877) and Susan Hammond. He was the brother of the Henry Weekes Jnr (1832-1902) and Frederick Weekes (1834–1924), both of whom were also artists. He lived with his family in Hanover Square and later Belgrave Place in St Pancras and most likely received tuition from his father and older brothers.

He started exhibiting at the British Institution in 1856 under his middle name of William. It is believed he began signing his works with this initial or name presumably to avoid confusion with his father and brother. He made his debut at the Royal Academy in 1865 and in the same year married the artist Caroline Anne Henshaw on 14 October. The couple lived at 129 Prince of Wales Road in St Pancras. He also exhibited at Suffolk Street and many provincial art galleries including the Walker Art Gallery, Royal Birmingham Society of Artists and the Manchester Art Gallery.

By 1879, Weekes had moved to 21 Oppidans Road, Primrose Hill in London where he lived and worked for the rest of his life. In addition to paintings, he also contributed illustrations for The Illustrated London News in 1883. He continued to exhibit at the Royal Academy throughout his life until 1904. He died in Primrose Hill on 21 November, 1914.

Weekes specialised in genre scenes, often painting humorous depictions of animals, posed in very human situations. He was one of a few talented artists who transformed animal painting of the 19th century from a record of beasts to something approaching a reflection of the human condition bringing him a popularity which continues to this day.

Examples of his work can be found in private and public art collections including The Hepworth Museum, Wakefield.

© Benton Fine Art

Presentation The work is housed in its original gilt frame which is in excellent condition. The reverse bears a label for the art dealer Eugene Haigh who was based at 13, Turnstile, Holborn and operated from the early 1900’s until 1907. It also retains an old handwritten label, most likely from the same gallery or possibly an exhibition.
Condition As with all of our original antique oil paintings, this work is offered in ready to hang gallery condition, having been professionally cleaned, restored and revarnished.

Dimensions

Image Size 7.75 inches x 11.25 inches (19.5cm x 28.5cm)
Framed Size 14 inches x 17.5 inches (35.5cm x 44.5cm)
£2,900.00