The Meet & The Chase
fine art painting
fine art painting
fine art painting
fine art painting
fine art painting
fine art painting
fine art painting
fine art painting
fine art painting
fine art painting
fine art painting
fine art painting
fine art painting
fine art painting

John Frederick Herring Snr

British, (1795-1865)
The Meet & The Chase
Oil on board, pair, both signed

John Frederick Herring was born in Christchurch, Surrey on 14 August, 1795, the son of Benjamin Herring, a London merchant of Dutch extraction and his wife Sarah Jemima Herring (née Howard). He grew up in London where he developed a keen interest in drawing and horses. On 14 July, 1814 he married Anna Catharina Harris. The couple moved to Doncaster and together they had 8 children. Three of their sons John Frederick Herring Jnr (c1820-1907), Charles Herring (1828-1908) and Benjamin Herring (1830-1871) all became artists.

He initially earned his living in Doncaster painting coach insignia and was also a coach driver. During his spare time, he produced portraits of hunters and racehorses for the gentry, gaining him recognition as the ‘artist coachman’. He made his debut at the Royal Academy in 1818 and continued to exhibit there until 1865. He also exhibited at the British Institution and the Society of British Artists.

Herring moved to Newmarket in 1830 where he was able to more closely study racehorses, before moving to London in 1833. Around this time, he is believed to have received tuition from Abraham Cooper and Sawrey Gilpin. His real success came in the early 1840’s after W T Copeland commissioned a number of paintings and designs for Spode china. In 1840 Herring was commissioned by the Duc D’Orleans to paint several pictures and in 1842, he became vice-president of the Society of British Artists. Further success came in 1845 when he was appointed Animal Painter to HRH the Duchess of Kent, followed by a commission from Queen Victoria who remained a patron for the rest of his life.

Around 1853, he moved to Meopham Park, Tonbridge where he continued to produce the hunting, racing and shooting scenes he was best known for but also painted a wider subject matter including agricultural scenes and narrative pictures. He died at Meopham Park on 23 December, 1865. Herring was one of the most successful and prolific animal painters of his time. Many of his works including St Leger and Derby winners as well as hunting scenes were produced as engravings. His works have retained their popularity amongst collectors today. Examples of his paintings can be found in various museums and galleries including the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Tate Gallery, Glasgow Art Gallery, Wolverhampton and Leeds art galleries.

Presentation The paintings are housed in their original gilt frames, which are in excellent condition.
Condition As with all of our original antique oil paintings, these works are offered in ready to hang gallery condition, having just been professionally cleaned, restored and revarnished.

Dimensions

Image Size (each) 5 inches x 7.75 inches (12.5cm x 19.5cm)
Framed Size (each) 9 inches x 11.75 inches (23cm x 30cm)
£6,900.00